Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold

Portland, OR   |  http://www.girlsincpnw.org

Mission

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold through direct service and advocacy. We make an impact in the communities we serve by equipping youth with the skills and confidence to access bright and economically-independent futures. By focusing on the whole girl from ages 6-18, we provide life-changing after school programs and experiences that help youth grow up to be healthy, educated, and independent. Our trained volunteer leaders, research-based curricula, and pro-girl environment provide youth with the tools, confidence, and support to realize their own power.

Notes from the nonprofit

To connect with us, please call, email, visit our website, or chat with us on social media. With your support, we can help more local youth break cycles of poverty and grow up to become the next generation of leaders. Thank you!

Ruling year info

2003

Chief Executive Officer

Cyreena Boston Ashby

Chief Programs Officer

Youn Han

Main address

4800 S Macadam Ave Suite 309

Portland, OR 97239 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-2073930

Subject area info

STEM education

Out-of-school learning

College preparation

Youth services

Youth mentoring

Population served info

Children and youth

Young girls

Preteen girls

Ethnic and racial groups

Low-income people

NTEE code info

(Girls Clubs) (O22)

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Despite the progress our society has made over the years, girls still face significant obstacles to growing up healthy, educated, and economically independent. For example, today in the Pacific Northwest: 1 in 5 girls live in poverty 1 in 4 girls are victims of sexual abuse or assault 1 in 20 teen girls become pregnant each year 1 in 7 girls do not graduate from high school Equally compelling, however, are the stories of empowerment, resilience, and leadership by Girls Inc. youth. As recent alumna Mekdes put it: “At Girls Inc., I felt as if a transformation had happened, as if I took one big step on the ladder of success, as if I paved a way for my own future. I felt as if a barrier was removed from my way. It was an exciting feeling, the feeling of pride in one’s own success, the feeling of overcoming fear through taking risks. And it is that moment of joy that makes me want to take another step, take another risk, and pave a new path.”

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls Groups

Girls Groups work in partnership with schools and communities throughout the Pacific Northwest. Each Girls Group has 10-15 girls, grouped by grade level (2nd-8th) and led by 1-2 adult mentors. Groups meet weekly after school, plus through field trips and summer day camps. Our trained staff and volunteer mentors provide age-appropriate lessons and activities in social-emotional learning, anti-bullying, academic tutoring, STEAM, media and financial literacy, teen pregnancy and drug abuse prevention, self-defense, leadership skills, and health, exercise, and nutrition.

This foundational program supports girls in their childhood and early teen years, setting them up for success in high school and beyond. Participants who are aging out of the program frequently choose to continue their “Girls Inc. Experience” through Eureka! and/or Leadership Council, and some even come back when they are adults to volunteer as mentors for current participants.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Girls
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants

Eureka! is a five-year STEAM program that empowers 8th - 12th grade youth to see themselves as an important part of the modern workforce. During the Eureka! program, youth participate in a variety of exciting and compelling activities that explore science, technology, engineering, art, and math through hands-on experiences in a college campus environment. With additional lessons in life skills and college-and-career readiness, Eureka! fully fosters educational, professional, and personal development. Long-term, Eureka! helps close the gender gap in STEM – where currently, only 25% of STEM professionals are women – and helps individuals, families, and communities break cycles of poverty.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Girls
Immigrants and migrants
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Leadership Council members — 6th-12th grade students — help us understand the rapidly changing, nuanced needs of today’s young people. Members serve on Leadership Council for at least one year, and work on individual and group projects, honing their skills around research, leadership, and community action. A variety of guest speakers from the community help youth hone their leadership and life skills, and expose youth to a variety of career paths and leadership opportunities they may not have otherwise considered.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants
Girls

Girls thINC Outside the Box (GTOB) is an activity box subscription program for youth ages 6-10 that brings the evidence-based “Girls Inc. Experience” directly to youths’ homes. Boxes are curated by youth development professionals to inspire youths’ self-confidence, creativity, problem-solving, and love of learning, while building key skills in literacy and STEM.

Each box contains an educational childrens’ book, a Girls Inc. Magazine (printed lessons, activities, and colorful illustrations), and supplies for 5+ hours of fun, hands-on learning. Quarterly “Zoom Parties” give youth a chance to meet other participants and our staff, and review and celebrate what youth are learning through GTOB.

GTOB centers BIPOC youth, LGBTQ+ youth, and youth with other diverse identities. Each magazine contains an illustrated lesson about a modern role model (a trailblazing youth or adult) with diverse identities and expertise in STEM, art, leadership, education, or specific life skills.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants
Women and girls

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Girls Incorporated 2005

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Eureka!

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In the Eureka! program, between 90-100% of our 12th grade youth plan on attending post-secondary education.

Number children performing average or above average academically

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A study by the American Institute for Research shows that Girls Inc. programming helps youth perform better in school, compared to their peers.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Eureka!

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All of the youth in our Eureka! program receive academic, career, and post-secondary education coaching and mentorship. During their 3rd and 5th years, youth participate in STEM internships.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Girls, At-risk youth, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Low-income people

Related Program

Girls Groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In all of our programs, youth are consistently interacting with two or more positive adult role models who exhibit our "Strong, Smart, and Bold" (healthy, educated, and independent) qualities.

Number of youth who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including social-emotional behaviors.

Number of youth who consider the implications of their actions on others, their community, and the environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including leadership skills.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Girls, At-risk youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Low-income people

Related Program

Leadership Council

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We consistently have about 15 youth on our Youth Leadership Council. Each member serves on the council for 1 or 2 years, and pursues an in-depth advocacy or volunteer project of interest to them.

Number of youth who model positive behaviors for peers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including positive behaviors.

Number of youth who demonstrate motivation to learn

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including motivation to learn.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including social skills.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed skills and attitudes to make physical activity a habit

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including physical activity levels.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive values

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including developing positive values.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including having healthy relationships.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed a strong sense of self

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including having a strong sense of self.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid using illegal substances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including avoiding substances use.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they are aware of their interests and abilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including a stronger sense of self.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including avoiding risky behaviors.

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Leadership Council

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including leadership skills.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest’s mission is to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold, with the long-term vision of having an equitable society.

Our mentors, peer support, and unique learning experiences equip girls with the knowledge, skills, and tools that are key to leading healthy lives, succeeding academically, and advocating for themselves and others. We help girls explore and celebrate their strengths and voices, and who they are today and who they will become. Our girls build confidence, embrace positive decision-making, take charge of their health and wellbeing, and achieve their academic, personal, and career goals.

Our long-term goals are to expand our enrollment and programming locations so that more girls in the Pacific Northwest can benefit from our high-quality programs and the life-changing “Girls Inc. Experience.”

As shown in a recent assessment by the American Institutes for Research, the “Girls Inc. Experience” makes a measurable and marked difference in the lives of girls. View the full report attached to our GuideStar profile or at girlsincpnw.org/stronger-smarter-bolder.

The Girls Inc. Experience consists of six essential elements. Together, they provide a comprehensive approach to youth development programming, that is grounded in a belief in girls' inherent rights and abilities.

(1) PRO-GIRL ENVIRONMENT: A pro-girl environment that is physically, socially, and emotionally safe and affirms that girls can succeed and deserve to be taken seriously for the adults they will become;

(2) MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS: Trusting, mentoring relationships with adult staff and volunteers who reflect the identities, lived experiences, and life goals and aspirations of our youth;

(3) INTENTIONAL PROGRAMMING: Holistic, compensatory, and intentional programming focused on girls' needs and that provides exposure to a wide variety of experiences and options that girls might not have experienced otherwise;

(4) RESEARCH-BASED CURRICULA: Relevant, field-tested, and research-based curricula that confront the serious needs of girls while building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to enable girls to be competent, confident adults;

(5) INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES: Motivating, deliberate, and interactive activities that develop and promote girls' strengths, and;

(6) SUSTAINED EXPOSURE: Sustained exposure to programming and connection with a girl over time to increase positive outcomes and reduce the potential for negative outcomes.

These six essential elements are embedded in our core programs: Girls Groups, Eureka!, and Leadership Council. We are also guided by the Girls Inc. Girls’ Bill of Rights, which states that all girls have the right to…

(1) Be themselves and to resist gender stereotypes
(2) Express themselves with originality and enthusiasm
(3) Take risks, to strive freely, and to take pride in success
(4) Accept and appreciate their bodies
(5) Have confidence in themselves and be safe in the world
(6) Prepare for interesting work and economic independence

All of this is encapsulated in our motto: “Strong, Smart, and Bold.” This is a fun way to say healthy, educated, and independent; it is also a confidence-building affirmation that our girls, volunteers, and staff love to use to celebrate themselves and uplift one another. It is also a statement of belief that our girls are inherently powerful, and have amazing potential despite the many obstacles they face in life. With the Girls Inc. Experience, girls can harness their innate power and learn, grow, and become “Strong, Smart, and Bold” throughout their childhood and adult lives.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest is uniquely experienced and equipped to help girls and youth build their resiliency, social-emotional development, and academic success as they and our society emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Girls Inc. PNW has been serving Portland since 1998, Southwest Washington since 2017, and Seattle since 2018. We are a locally-governed, two-state affiliate of Girls Incorporated®, the nation's leading voice for girls.

Girls Incorporated® provides program research and development, staff training, and advocacy support to 70+ affiliate organizations across the U.S. and Canada. Girls Incorporated® originated in 1864, and is guided by a belief in the inherent potential of each girl.

Through partnerships with local schools, our PNW affiliate uses an outreach approach, taking our programs to schools where girls are already situated, with trained staff and volunteer facilitators who come from the communities they serve. Our "pipeline" model supports girls as they progress from elementary school through high school, so they get the sustained “Girls Inc. Experience” throughout their crucial youth development years.

Since April 2020, Girls Inc. PNW programs have been primarily operating via Zoom. We adapted our regular programming lessons and activities into Zoom-friendly formats, donated laptops and Internet hotspots to youth in need, and added Wellness Workshops and Tutoring to address youths’ needs for increased stress-relief, social connections, and academic support during the pandemic.

As of early 2022, we are now offering a few in-person Girls Groups again, in addition to virtual Girls Groups. Going forward, we will gradually increase our in-person Girls Groups, Leadership Council, and Eureka! programming activities, in accordance with local COVID-19 safety precautions and input from youth, families, and schools.

Despite the challenges of the pandemic, Girls Inc. PNW has continued to adapt and serve hundreds of youth through our life-changing mentorship and peer support programs.

The “Girls Inc. Experience” equips girls to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers, and grow into healthy, educated, and independent adults. Third-party research studies confirm what we see firsthand about the impact of Girls Inc. PNW programs.

For example, a recent multi-year study by the American Institutes for Research shows that Girls Inc. programs help youth excel in more than 20 key areas. The research team found, “Girls participating in Girls Inc. were more likely to engage in activities and express beliefs that lead to physical and mental well-being, academic achievement, and the development of leadership skills… [They] had consistently higher math test scores…[and] Girls Inc. girls reported more positive attitudes and behaviors than the comparison group.”

Compared to their peers, our youth are also more likely to graduate from high school and pursue post-secondary education. Furthermore, according to Oregon Afterschool & Summer for Kids Network, every $1 invested into high-quality youth development programs leads to a $4.60 return on investment for the community! This is because programs like Girls Inc.’s help increase graduation rates while decreasing grade repetition, drug and alcohol addiction, crime rates, and obesity-related healthcare costs.

Prior to the pandemic, we had ambitious expansion plans to bring the life-changing “Girls Inc. Experience” to even more youth across the Pacific Northwest. Then, the pandemic initially necessitated we pause our expansion plans, and focus on serving our current communities more deeply. In fall 2021, upon community requests and new grant investments, we resumed our plans to expand the Eureka! program into SW Washington. Eureka! will begin serving Clark County youth in Summer 2022.

In 2022 and beyond, we will continue refining and acting upon our strategic plan and expansion plans, in line with our mission to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold. We hope you will join us during this pivotal time for supporting youth in our region!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest serves 2nd-12th grade girls and youth in the Portland Metro, SW Washington, and Seattle areas. Our programs serve girls and youth from historically marginalized and economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Most of our youth (70%+) come from low-or-moderate income households, attend Title 1 schools, and qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. Most of our youth are also girls of color (60%+) from a variety of racial and ethnic backgrounds. Some of our youth are also English language learners, immigrants or refugees, LGBTQ+, have a disability, or live with mental health challenges. We partner with local Title 1 schools to help us identify youth most in need of the mentorship and support that our programs provide.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email, Informal conversations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Between April 2020 and December 2021, when our programs operated primarily via Zoom, we were able to reach new youth throughout Oregon and Washington, including youth in rural areas. One girl said, “I just wanted to let you know that this program is so amazing and I love how funny you [staff] are. I get really excited for Friday evenings (it’s the only Zoom I always look forward to)! You’re a very sweet leader and I’m happy I know you.” Going into the 2022-2023 school year, as our core programs transition back to in-person programming, many youth who live far from our in-person service areas have expressed interest in continued remote program options. To satisfy this need, we are launching a new program, Girls thINC Outside the Box: https://girlsincpnw.org/what-we-do/programs/gtob/

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    At Girls Inc. PNW, our team highly values direct input from youth, their families, and their school teachers. We create intentional opportunities for input through surveys, one-on-one and group conversations, and through Leadership Council. Members of Leadership Council (6th-12th grade youth) provide regular input into all Girls Inc. PNW programs. These remarkable young leaders help us understand the rapidly changing, nuanced needs and interests of today’s young people, so we can tailor our programs and services accordingly. In turn, youth practice and develop their leadership skills, so they can effectively exercise their power and advocacy in many other contexts and spaces throughout their lives.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.59

Average of 7.18 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.2

Average of 5.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Cyreena Boston Ashby

In March 2021, Cyreena Boston Ashby joined Girls Inc. PNW as CEO after working in Oregon public affairs and nonprofits for over 15 years. Cyreena is a proud alumna of two all women's institutions, St. Mary's Academy and Spelman College; and has earned Executive Education Certificates from the European Institute of Business Administration and Harvard Business School. Cyreena has worked on issues such as racial justice, LGBTQ rights, affordable housing, public education, and workers’ rights through the Democratic National Committee, Obama for America, and the offices of Senator Jeff Merkley and Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber. Cyreena was also the first Director of the Portland African American Leadership Forum. Most recently, Cyreena was a Partner at Hilltop Public Solutions. In the local community, Cyreena also serves as Chair of the NW Health Foundation, a board member of Health Share of Oregon and Trillium Family Services, and a trustee of the French American International School.

Chief Programs Officer

Youn Han

Youn Han is a proud first generation Korean-American-Atlantan, with a B.A. in International Affairs from the University of Georgia and a Master of Science degree in Environmental Studies from Antioch University New England. Driven by a passion for people, growth, and connection, Youn has been leading environmental education, community leadership, and youth service programs since 2008. Before becoming our Chief Programs Officer, Youn was our Eureka! Program Manager. She brings with her an extensive history of direct service, system-level administration, and program management from her previous work history, which includes the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, Portland Audubon, and the Student Conservation Organization. Among her professional background, her most inspirational and humbling experiences have been collaborating and working directly with colleagues, community members, and youth who show strength against oppression with ferocity, grace, and courage.

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
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Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Board of directors
as of 09/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board chair

Mary Kay Petersen

Retired

Term: 2016 - 2023

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Bank of America

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Edward Powers

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Corina Davis

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/20/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/16/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.