Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Inspiring all girls to be Strong, Smart, and Bold

Portland, OR   |  http://www.girlsincpnw.org

Mission

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest inspires all girls to be strong, smart, and bold through direct service and advocacy. We make an impact in the communities we serve by equipping youth with the skills and confidence to access bright and economically-independent futures. By focusing on the whole girl from ages 6-18, we provide life-changing after school programs and experiences that help youth grow up to be healthy, educated, and independent. Our trained volunteer leaders, research-based curricula, and pro-girl environment provide youth with the tools, confidence, and support to realize their own power.

Notes from the nonprofit

Thank you for taking the time to learn about Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest. Please visit our website and call or email to learn more and connect with us. Our door is always open.

Ruling year info

2003

Chief Executive Officer

Cyreena Boston Ashby

Director of Programs

Donya Saunders

Main address

4800 S Macadam Ave Suite 309

Portland, OR 97239 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-2073930

Subject area info

Equal opportunity in education

STEM education

Out-of-school learning

College preparation

Youth services

NTEE code info

(Girls Clubs) (O22)

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Today, girls continue to encounter significant obstacles to their well-being and success. For example: 1 in 7 U.S. girls will not finish high school 1 in 4 girls will be a victim of childhood sexual abuse Over 1 in 20 teen girls becomes pregnant each year. Only 48% of U.S. girls (ages 10-17) have high self esteem Only 25% of STEM jobs are held by women For the first time in history, our next generation of leaders will be mostly women leaders — particularly women of color, many of whom will start out at a socioeconomic disadvantage. This means that more girls, and more girls of color, need to be prepared to step into leadership roles. Because of the pandemic, our girls are also dealing with toxic stress, loss of learning, and material hardships. Philip Fisher, a neuroscientist at the University of Oregon, said, “The kids will carry these experiences through life… And it’s not going to be good.” Participation in Girls Inc. helps ameliorate these ill effects.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls Groups

Girls Groups are our most wide-reaching program, operating in partnership with multiple school districts and dozens of community partners throughout the Pacific Northwest. Girls Groups meet after school on a weekly basis for 90-120 minutes over three, eight-week terms. Through research-based, gender-specific programming, Girls Groups are formed by age group and designed to help participants grow up to be healthy, educated, and independent. Over the course of the year, groups focus on different Strong, Smart or Bold themes, diving into age-specific curricula such as: Allies in Action, Operation SMART, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Mind + Body, Healthy Sexuality, Project BOLD, Go Girl Go!, Sporting Chance, Leadership and Community Action, and She Votes.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
Girls
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants

Girls Inc. Eureka! is a 5-year STEM magnet program for 8th - 12th grade youth, that empowers them to see themselves as an important part of the future workforce. During the Eureka! program, youth participate in a variety of exciting lessons and activities that explore STEM through inquiry-based, critical thinking and hands-on activities in a college campus environment. With complimentary activities in making healthy choices, emerging adulthood, and life skill development, Eureka! fully fosters educational, professional, and personal development.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Girls
Immigrants and migrants
At-risk youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Leadership Council serves as the youth leadership body of our organization. Comprised of youth from communities across the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 8-18, Leadership Council members help our affiliate understand the needs of young people, and use the power of their voice to create meaningful change. Members serve on Leadership Council for at least one year, focusing and honing skills around leadership, advocacy, and community action.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth
Immigrants and migrants
Girls

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Girls Incorporated 2005

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

In the Eureka! program, between 90-100% of our 12th grade youth plan on attending post-secondary education.

Number children performing average or above average academically

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A study by the American Institute for Research shows that Girls Inc. programming helps youth perform better in school, compared to their peers.

Number of youth receiving services (e.g., groups, skills and job training, etc.) with youths living in their community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All of the youth in our Eureka! program receive academic, career, and post-secondary education coaching and mentorship. During their 3rd and 5th years, youth participate in STEM internships.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Girls, At-risk youth, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In all of our programs, youth are consistently interacting with two or more positive adult role models who exhibit our "Strong, Smart, and Bold" (healthy, educated, and independent) qualities.

Number of youth who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including social-emotional behaviors.

Number of youth who consider the implications of their actions on others, their community, and the environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including leadership skills.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Girls, At-risk youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

We consistently have about 15 youth on our Youth Leadership Council. Each member serves on the council for 1 or 2 years, and pursues an in-depth advocacy or volunteer project of interest to them.

Number of youth who model positive behaviors for peers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including positive behaviors.

Number of youth who demonstrate motivation to learn

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including motivation to learn.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including social skills.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed skills and attitudes to make physical activity a habit

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including physical activity levels.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive values

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including developing positive values.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed healthy relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including having healthy relationships.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed a strong sense of self

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including having a strong sense of self.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid using illegal substances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including avoiding substances use.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they are aware of their interests and abilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including a stronger sense of self.

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including avoiding risky behaviors.

Number of youth who demonstrate leadership skills (e.g., organizing others, taking initiative, team-building)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Girls, At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A rigorous comparative study by the American Institutes for Research found that Girls Inc. youth have an advantage over their peers in more than 20 key areas, including leadership skills.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Girls Groups curriculum addresses STEM education, pregnancy and drug abuse prevention, media literacy, financial literacy, bullying and violence prevention, adolescent health, social-emotional health, leadership skills development, and sports participation.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest inspires girls to lead healthy lives, succeed academically, and advocate for themselves and others. We help girls explore and celebrate their strengths, their voices, who they are today, and who they will become. Our girls build confidence, embrace positive decision-making, take charge of their health and wellbeing, and achieve their academic, personal, and career goals.

As shown in a recent assessment by the American Institutes for Research, the Girls Inc. Experience makes a measurable and marked difference in the lives of girls, regardless of demographic, academic, and social characteristics. View the full report attached to our GuideStar profile or at girlsincpnw.org/stronger-smarter-bolder.

The Girls Inc. Experience consists of six essential elements. Together, they provide a holistic approach that is grounded in a belief in girls' rights and abilities.

(1) PRO-GIRL ENVIRONMENT: A pro-girl environment that is physically, socially, and emotionally safe and confirms that girls can succeed and deserve to be taken seriously for the women they will become;
(2) MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS: Trusting, mentoring relationships with adult staff and volunteers trained in an approach that is grounded in a belief in girls' rights and abilities;
(3) INTENTIONAL PROGRAMMING: Holistic, compensatory, and intentional programming focused on girls' needs and that provides exposure to a wide variety of experiences and options that girls might not have experienced otherwise;
(4) RESEARCH-BASED CURRICULA: Relevant, field-tested, and research-based curricula that confront the serious needs of girls while building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to enable girls to be competent, confident individuals and adult women;
(5) INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES: Girl-centered, motivating, deliberate, and interactive activities that develop and promote girls' strengths, and;
(6) SUSTAINED EXPOSURE: Sustained exposure to programming and connection with a girl over time to increase positive outcomes and reduce the potential for negative outcomes.

These six essential elements are embedded in our core programs: Girls Groups, Eureka!, and Leadership Council. (See below for more details.)

We are also guided by the Girls Inc. Girls’ Bill of Rights, which states:

(1) Girls have the right to be themselves and to resist gender stereotypes
(2) Girls have the right to express themselves with originality and enthusiasm
(3) Girls have the right to take risks, to strive freely, and to take pride in success
(4) Girls have the right to accept and appreciate their bodies
(5) Girls have the right to have confidence in themselves and be safe in the world
(6) Girls have the right to prepare for interesting work and economic independence

All of this is encapsulated in our motto: “Strong, Smart, and Bold.” This is a fun way to say healthy, educated, and independent; it is a confidence-building affirmation that our girls, volunteers, and staff love to use to celebrate themselves and uplift one another. It is also a statement of belief that our girls are inherently powerful, and have amazing potential despite the many obstacles they face in life. With the Girls Inc. Experience, girls can harness their innate power and learn, grow, and become “Strong, Smart, and Bold” throughout their childhood and adult lives.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest has been operating in Portland since 1998, Southwest Washington since 2017, and Seattle since 2018. We are a financially independent, regional affiliate of the national organization, Girls Incorporated®, the nation's leading voice for girls.

Girls Incorporated® provides program research, development, training, and advocacy support to 90+ affiliate organizations across the U.S. and Canada. Girls Incorporated® was founded in 1864, and is guided by a belief in the inherent potential of each girl.

Through our partnerships with local schools and other community-based organizations, our affiliate has pursued an outreach approach, taking our programs to schools where girls are already situated, and using a volunteer-led model that harnesses the power of trained volunteers who come from the communities they serve. Our "pipeline" model supports girls as they progress from elementary school through high school, so they get the sustained Girls Inc. Experience with age-appropriate programming during their crucial youth development years.

Our foundational Girls Groups program operates in partnership with multiple school districts and dozens of community partners throughout the Pacific Northwest. Girls Groups meet after school on a weekly basis for 90-120 minutes over three, eight-week terms. Through research-based, gender-specific programming, Girls Groups are formed by age group and designed to help participants grow up to be healthy, educated, and independent. Over the course of the year, groups focus on different Strong, Smart or Bold themes, diving into age-specific curricula such as: Allies in Action, Operation SMART, Economic Literacy, Media Literacy, Mind + Body, Healthy Sexuality, Project BOLD, Go Girl Go!, Sporting Chance, Leadership and Community Action, and She Votes.

Eureka! is our 5-year STEM magnet program for 8th - 12th grade girls, that empowers girls to see themselves as an important part of the future workforce. During the Eureka! program, girls participate in a variety of exciting lessons and activities that explore STEM through inquiry-based, critical thinking and hands-on activities in a college campus environment. With complimentary activities in making healthy choices, emerging adulthood, and life skill development, Eureka! fully fosters educational, professional, and personal development.

The Leadership Council serves as the youth leadership body of our organization. Comprising girls from communities across the Pacific Northwest ranging in age from 8-18, Leadership Council members help our affiliate understand the needs of young people, and use the power of their voice to create meaningful change. Members serve on Leadership Council for at least one year, focusing and honing skills around leadership, advocacy, and community action.

During the pandemic, we have additionally launched monthly Yoga / Wellness Workshops and Homework Help (tutoring) sessions via Zoom.

Girls who participate in Girls Inc. gain considerable knowledge and skills from their formal and informal contact with our staff and programming. In 2020, the American Institutes for Research said, “In a rigorous comparison study, we found that girls who participate in the Girls Inc. Experience demonstrated improved academic performance, school-related behaviors, physical activity, and leadership outcomes.“

The multi-year study found that compared to their peers, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely to…
Perform better on standardized math tests
Be more engaged in school
Exhibit postsecondary readiness and confidence
Think math is fun
Believe in their ability to do challenging math
Believe in their ability to do challenging reading
Think science is fun
Believe in their ability to do challenging science
Get excited about science
Are curious about science
Enjoy games that teach science concepts
Like to see how things are made
Want to know more about science, computers, or technology
Want to have a computer or science job
Exercise daily
Play on sports teams
Leadership: Exhibit strong leadership skills and see themselves as leaders
Self-Efficacy: Believe in their ability to contribute in their community
Advocacy: Stand up for fairness and their own beliefs
Adult Partnership: Rely on positive relationships with adults
Furthermore, in 2019, 93% of Girls Inc. girls said that there are adults at Girls Inc. they can depend on to help them.

In the 2016-2017 school year, our affiliate served 2,100 girls and added summer camps for Girls Groups. In 2017 and 2018, we began programming in SW Washington and Seattle, and have been growing our youth programming and local partnerships ever since. We now have offices in Portland, Vancouver, and Seattle, with board members from each of these locations.

Before COVID-19 began, we had over 80 Girls Groups meeting weekly in partnership with over 40 school and community partners. When we went virtual, we condensed groups into more centralized spaces to foster a regional community of support. We started weekly Zoom Girls Groups, began monthly Wellness Workshops, and continued engaging with key partners to serve over 90 girls. Our Eureka! team put on 37 learning events for over 100 young leaders with the help of 18 partners over the course of the year. We also distributed 70 summer STEM-activities kits to girls, and expanded our Leadership Council to be a two-year program to provide more opportunities for in-depth, individual advocacy projects. Our 2019-2021 Council includes 17 incredible young people from over 14 different schools across the Portland area.

Our programs will remain online for the remainder of the 2020-2021 school year, and likely into Fall 2021. However, we are consistently monitoring the COVID-19 situation and discussing with our school partners their tentative plans for reopening, going hybrid, or remaining online, and how this affects our girls and Girls Inc.’s responsive programming.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest serves 1st-12th grade girls and gender-expansive youth in the Portland Metro, SW Washington, and Seattle areas. Most of our youth come from low-income families and are black, Indigenous, and people of color. Some are also LGBTQ+, are immigrants or refugees, are English-language learners, or have a disability. We partner with local Title 1 schools to help us identify youth who need the extra social-emotional and academic support that our programs provide.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email, Informal conversations,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic, our programs have been operating primarily via Zoom, and our girls and their families have asked for more informal social opportunities, stress-relief activities, and academic support. In response, we added monthly Wellness Workshops featuring a guest yoga teacher, and Homework Help, which matches qualified volunteer tutors with students in need of extra support. Wellness Workshops have been super popular. Yoga helps the youth stay physically active while learning stress-reducing mindfulness and breathing techniques. Homework Help is steadily growing the number of tutor-student matches and sessions, and feedback from parents and students has been very positive.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Leadership Council members, ages 8-18, help our affiliate understand the needs of today’s young people and empowers them to use the power of their voice to create meaningful change. Members serve on Leadership Council for at least one year, where they pick an advocacy project and focus on honing skills around leadership, advocacy, and community action. Feedback from girls on our Leadership Council continually strengthens our relationships with all of our girls. Our girls provide great insights and ideas about their needs and desires that we then implement throughout our regional programming. Other feedback from youth, their families, and their schools also guides our programming to respond to ever-changing local and regional needs.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest
Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30
Financial documents
2020 FY19-20 Audited Financial Statements
done  Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant. info

Revenue vs. expenses:  breakdown

SOURCE: IRS Form 990 info
NET GAIN/LOSS:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.

Liquidity in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

2.59

Average of 7.18 over 10 years

Months of cash in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

6.2

Average of 5.7 over 10 years

Fringe rate in 2020 info

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

18%

Average of 15% over 10 years

Funding sources info

Source: IRS Form 990

Assets & liabilities info

Source: IRS Form 990

Financial data

Source: IRS Form 990 info

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Revenue & expenses

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Balance sheet

Fiscal Year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

The balance sheet gives a snapshot of the financial health of an organization at a particular point in time. An organization's total assets should generally exceed its total liabilities, or it cannot survive long, but the types of assets and liabilities must also be considered. For instance, an organization's current assets (cash, receivables, securities, etc.) should be sufficient to cover its current liabilities (payables, deferred revenue, current year loan, and note payments). Otherwise, the organization may face solvency problems. On the other hand, an organization whose cash and equivalents greatly exceed its current liabilities might not be putting its money to best use.

Fiscal year ending: cloud_download Download Data

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Documents
Letter of Determination is not available for this organization
Form 1023/1024 is not available for this organization

Chief Executive Officer

Cyreena Boston Ashby

Cyreena Boston Ashby joins GIPNW as its CEO after working in Oregon's public affairs and nonprofit arena for over 15 years. She first began public service at the age of 10, when she knocked on doors for a community group seeking solutions to food insecurity. As a young child, Cyreena began to self-identify as an activist which inspired her career in public affairs. Professionally, Cyreena has also worked on such issues as racial justice, marriage and LGBTQ equity, affordable housing, public education, and workers’ rights. Cyreena worked for the Democratic National Committee, Obama for America, United States Senator Jeff Merkley, Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber, and was the first Director of the Portland African American Leadership Forum. Cyreena led the Oregon Public Health Institute as its Chief Executive Officer, and then became Partner at Hilltop Public Solutions providing strategic solutions to public and private entities, political candidates, and elected officials.

Director of Programs

Donya Saunders

Donya's devotion to advocate for youth began over two decades ago, when she established a drop-in tutoring program for youth in her community, which was supported by the LA County Sheriff's Youth Activity League. As a transplant from Compton, California, Donya immediately felt welcomed by the South Seattle community where she worked with a division under Seattle Parks and Recreation. Donya’s leadership with young people has ranged from direct services, coordinating elementary and middle school programs, to managing multiple sites that served over 1,000 girls annually. Her passion for working with youth is embedded in breaking down racial and gender inequities, and the belief that direct resources offered have a lasting impact upon our communities. Donya's commitment to young people, youth workers, families, and community will always challenge her to be a better leader, and we are fortunate to have her continued experience at Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest (GIPNW).

Number of employees

Source: IRS Form 990

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Officers, directors, trustees, and key employees

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

Compensation
Other
Related
Show data for fiscal year
Compensation data
Download up to 5 most recent years of officer and director compensation data for this organization

There are no highest paid employees recorded for this organization.

Girls Inc. of the Pacific Northwest

Board of directors
as of 3/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board of directors data
Download the most recent year of board of directors data for this organization
Board co-chair

Julie Kearney

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Term: 2017 - 2023


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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data